Vaccines

Cat getting a vaccine

How do vaccines work?

Vaccines administer a very low dose of a pathogen to a pet, so that their immune system can “learn” to fight it. When a virus or bacteria enters the animal’s body for the first time, they will not possess an immunity, but introducing the disease prompts their system to manufacture antibodies to help fight it, explains the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Those antibodies then live in their bloodstream from then on, so should they encounter that pathogen in real life, full-strength, they will already have the tools to fight it.

Which vaccines does my pet need?

Pet vaccination are divided into two primary categories: Core and Non-c ore.

Core vaccines for dogs include canine parvovirus, canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis and rabies. Core inoculations for cats include feline panleukopenia, feline calicivirus, feline rhinotracheitis and rabies.

Non-Core vaccines may be recommended and administered based on lifestyle factors. Our skilled veterinarians will help you determine which non-core vaccinations are best for your pet. Keep in mind that some boarding facilities require non-core vaccinations. Our goal is to protect your beloved companion from the diseases they are most likely to encounter without over-vaccinating them.

Below is a general guideline for canine vaccinations:

6-8 Weeks10-12 weeks14-16 weeksAnnual 3 Year
CORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINES
DAP*DAP*DAP*DAP*DAP*
RabiesRabies Rabies
NON-CORE VACCINESNON-CORE VACCINESNON-CORE VACCINESNON-CORE VACCINESNON-CORE VACCINES
BordetellaLeptospirosisLeptospirosisLeptospirosisLeptospirosis
ParainfluenzaLymeLymeLymeLyme
Canine influenzaCanine influenzaCanine influenzaCanine influenza
Bordetella

*DAP: Distemper, Adenovirus/Hepatitis, Parvovirus. Sometimes referred to as DHP or DHPP if parainfluenza is included. 

Your pet is not considered immune to these diseases until  2 weeks after the vaccine series is complete. Please do not take them to public areas until they are fully vaccinated.




Below is a general guideline for feline vaccinations:

6-8 Weeks    10-12 weeks 14-16 weeksAnnual3 Year
CORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINESCORE VACCINES
FVRCP*FVRCP*FVRCP*FVRCP*FVRCP*
RabiesRabies
NON-CORE VACCINES NON-CORE VACCINES NON-CORE VACCINES NON-CORE VACCINES NON-CORE VACCINES
Feline leukemiaFeline leukemiaFeline leukemiaFeline leukemia

*FVRCP: feline rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia (FVRCP)

Your pet is not considered immune to these diseases until  2 weeks after the vaccine series is complete. Please do not take them to public areas until they are fully vaccinated.



WHAT IS CANINE DISTEMPER?

Canine distemper is an extremely contagious viral disease. The virus replicates in the body and attacks the gastrointestinal, respiratory, urogenital and nervous systems. Unfortunately, there is no known cure for canine distemper.

WHAT IS ADENOVIRUS & HEPATITIS? 

The canine adenovirus type 1 causes canine hepatitis. Dogs who suffer from this virus experience swelling and cell damage in the liver, which can result in hemorrhage and death. This virus can be contracted through feces and urine of infected dogs. The canine adenovirus type 2 is a relative of the hepatitis virus and is one of the causes of kennel cough.

WHAT IS PARAINFLUENZA?

Parainfluenza, or canine influenza is highly contagious. Symptoms include dry cough, fever, wheezing, difficulty breathing, runny nose, sneezing, pneumonia, reduced appetite, lethargy, eye inflammation, runny eyes and conjunctivitis. 

WHAT IS PARVOVIRUS? 

Canine parvovirus is extremely contagious and is contracted through the feces of an infected dog and can live in the environment for up to 3 days.  The parvo vaccine is the only way to prevent a dog from contracting this virus. Parvo cannot be spread from dogs to humans. The most commonly seen symptoms of parvo include: secondary infections, dehydration, lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, endotoxemia, shock and eventually death. 

WHAT IS RABIES?

Rabies is a  deadly viral infection most commonly spread through bite wounds, but can also be transmitted to any mammal by exposure of an open wound to the saliva of an infected animal. Humans are at risk of infection if bitten by an infected animal or if the saliva of an infected animal comes into contact with an open wound. Rabies is routinely fatal once symptoms develop.

WHAT IS BORDETELLA? 

Bordetella aka Kennel Cough is caused by bacteria and is spread through airborne contaminants. Bordetella is spread through exposure to infected dogs or the transfer of bacteria in food bowls, cages and water bowls. As bacteria multiply, it destroys the lining of the dog’s trachea, which results in a high pitched cough. 

WHAT IS CANINE INFLUENZA?

Canine influenza is caused by the canine influenza virus (CIV). It is highly contagious and easily spread from infected dogs to other dogs by direct contact, nasal secretions, and contaminated objects.

WHAT IS LEPTOSPIROSIS?

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection.  Dogs become infected by consuming urine contaminated water or coming in contact with infected urine. 

WHAT IS LYME DISEASE? 

Lyme disease is spread through a tick bite. Symptoms don’t always appear for all dogs with Lyme disease although some will show swollen lymph nodes or lameness. Untreated Lyme disease can cause extreme inflammation in your dog’s nervous system, heart and kidneys and potentially lead to death.

WHAT IS FVRCP? 

Feline herpesvirus (viral rhinotracheitis) is a virus that causes upper respiratory infection with fever, sneezing, eye and nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, inflammation of the cornea, and lethargy. Kittens have an increased risk of infection. Calicivirus is highly contagious and ubiquitous virus is one of the major causes of upper respiratory infection in cats. In some cases, affected kittens may develop pneumonia. Panleukopenia (feline distemper)is a highly contagious and potentially lethal virus causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and in some cases, sudden death. Kittens are particularly susceptible.

WHAT IS FELINE LEUKEMIA?

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is one of the most common infectious diseases in cats. The virus is shed in saliva, nasal secretions, urine, feces, and milk of infected cats. It is the most common cause of cancer in cats, may cause various blood disorders, and may lead to a state of immune deficiency that hinders a cat's ability to protect itself against other infections.

Are there side effects to vaccinating?

Usually, no. Vaccines are safe and well-vetted, and we’ve been using the same ones on dogs and cats for years. At most, pets may experience a bit of mild fever or discomfort associated with the low dose of the disease they’ve received. In rare cases, however, you may notice a serious allergic reaction: itching and swelling of the skin and face, vomiting and diarrhea, or difficulty breathing. If you notice any of these symptoms, please seek veterinary assistance immediately.